BIG NEWS: The WiTOpoli POSITION PRIMER is here!

We interrupt our regularly scheduled Ask Your Candidate series because we can’t keep this exciting news under wraps anymore…

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Help us empower Toronto voters with the Position Primer!

Today, we are launching a crowdfunding campaign to build the Position Primer, an easy-to-use website that will help Torontonians make informed decisions in the upcoming City Council race. We’re really excited about it!

Toronto voters who visit the Position Primer need only enter their postal codes to access a ward-specific chart that details their Council candidates’ stances on city-wide issues such as transportation, childcare and affordable housing, as well as major concerns that are unique to each ward. Learn more by visiting our crowdfunding page.

By simplifying the decision-making process, Women in Toronto Politics founder Steph Guthrie believes this tool will encourage more Torontonians to get out the vote. Guthrie also argues that the Position Primer “will provide equitable opportunity for all candidates to share their campaign platforms with a wider audience, regardless of the resources at their disposal.”

The Position Primer has already accrued impressive endorsements from supporters like Alison Loat, co-founder of non-partisan democracy think-tank Samara Canada. Loat says the Position Primer will “provide Toronto voters with the trusted, impartial information they need to feel confident about exercising their democratic voice.”

Funds raised from the crowdfunding campaign will support the design, development and promotion of the Position Primer, ensuring that it is user-friendly and reaches as many voters as possible.

Women in Toronto Politics hosts a launch party for the Position Primer crowdfunding campaign on July 29th from 7:00-9:00pm at the Monarch Tavern. We hope to see you there. And in the meantime, please check out the campaign and spread the word!

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, July 18

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Over 1,000 people took to the streets last Saturday for SlutWalk Toronto. The now-annual parade began as a protest in response to comments made by Toronto police Constable Michael Sanguinetti, who suggested that “…women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.” After just three years, SlutWalks are now being organized in over 200 cities around the world.
  • Toronto mayoral candidate Olivia Chow has promised to lobby the federal government to ban handguns in the GTA. This sparked discussion in the #TOpoli Twittersphere about the implicit and explicit racism often afoot when we talk about (and build public policy around) gun control – including this response from Ward 2 Council candidate Andray Domise.
  • The provincial Liberals are resubmitting the budget that triggered last month’s election, which includes ambitious new initiatives such a province-wide pension plan and a pledge of $15-billion for GTA transit.
  • The last Morgentaler Clinic in the Maritimes shuts its doors this week, but the fight to save it continues. Over $100,000 has been raised to support Fredericton’s sole private abortion clinic, which has been forced to close due to the provincial government’s refusal to fund its services.
  • Bitch magazine’s profile of Lucy Flores —who’s running to be the first Latina Lieutenant Governor of Nevada —showcases this “new kind of role model for Latina women” and reveals how “her own lived experience becomes the basis of her progressive agenda for social change.”
  • Britain’s PM David Cameron is expected to promote as many as 12 women to his cabinet and the lower ministerial ranks as part of a major reshuffle. Cameron has frequently been criticized by the lack of female representation in his Conservative party

Ask Your Candidate: Labour

By: Cherise Seucharan

Issues related to labour, such as wages and employment, are generally governed at the provincial level, but city councillors can still have significant impact on labour conditions. Recently, the Ford administration has claimed the drop in Toronto’s unemployment rate as one of their major achievements, and while this may have been true for the first three years of Rob Ford’s term, statistics show that unemployment has actually been on the rise since May 2014, coupled with increased in the number of precarious workers. Sandy Houston, President of the Metcalf Foundation, which recently released a report on Toronto’s workforce, says that, “The increasing numbers of people working and poor in the Toronto Region paints a troubling picture. When people can’t fully participate in society, it costs us all.”

Women are especially affected by labour policies. The gender wage gap in Ontario is currently 28%, which means female workers earn 72 cents to every male worker’s dollar. Women are also more likely to be employed in the service sector, which is more vulnerable to cuts, and are more likely to be supporting families on their income. Ask your candidate about how they plan to address these issues.

2009 City of Toronto inside and outside workers strike Mel Lastman Square. By CeciliaPang (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3A2009TorontoStrikeNY.jpg

2009 City of Toronto inside and outside workers strike Mel Lastman Square. By CeciliaPang (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons.

Do you plan on making improvements to the City’s Fair Wage policies? Will you introduce policies to support the growing number of precarious workers, and address the gender pay gap?

Toronto’s Fair Wage Policy, established in 1893, guarantees that people employed by contractors for the city are paid market wage rates and benefits for their respective fields. The policy needs to be continually updated to account for inflation and other factors, but in 2013 the policy had its first update in 10 years. Despite the fact that wages now take into account the new minimum wage rates and market levels, many of the wage rates still fall below, $16.60, the rate recommended by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives as a living wage in Toronto. Ask your candidate if they will push for continuous updates to the Fair Wage Policy, and for wages that take into account the high cost of living in Toronto.

The Fair Wage Policy also represents the type of initiatives that can work with provincial and federal labour policies to improve worker conditions, especially for minority groups. As noted above, women in Ontario still earn less than men overall. Additionally, racialized workers earn 77.5 cents per dollar, while immigrant women earn even less, and are more likely to be working for minimum wage. Ask if your candidate would support expanding these policies to include provisions that help close the gender pay gap and support immigrant and racialized workers.

Would you privatize more city services?

While there are pros and cons to the privatization of city services, deciding to privatize any service would have a major impact on the labour force. With the numbers of precarious workers steadily rising across the GTA, unionized services address this issue by providing steady employment and a living wage for thousands of Torontonians. Under privatization, city workers have less power to negotiate and less protections overall, which have already come under fire during the past few years.

Ask if your candidate aims to privatize city services, and if so, are they willing to prioritize the right of workers in the process.

Does you support funding for Toronto’s libraries and public services?

Cuts to the infamous “gravy train” of funding to libraries and public services often translate to reductions in the staff that keep those programs running. The result is that public service workers have to take on a greater workload with the same resources. Often, full-time positions are downsized to part-time, non-salary jobs. In 2012, cuts to libraries reached a tipping point when Toronto Public Library workers held an 11-day strike in reaction to the increasing funding cuts, which greatly affected the employment of part-time workers (who were primarily women). The strike highlights the need for greater worker protection at these services which benefit many people across the city.

Ask if your candidate supports maintaining or increasing funding to Toronto’s public services.

Ultimately, the candidates we elect to City council are responsible for creating the labour climate that many of the city’s unionized workers will live in for the next four years, from outside workers to parks and recreation staff, from police officers to garbage collectors to library workers. Electing a council that will be fair and just when dealing with labour issues should be a priority for Toronto voters.

 

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, July 11

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

Ask Your Candidate: Youth

By: Lauren Simmons, with files from Ali Chatur

Electoral candidates often talk about making Toronto better for the “citizens of tomorrow”, but concrete action from City Council on issues that impact youth in Toronto can be hard to come by. While youth under 18 aren’t able to vote, those who we elect on their behalf will make many decisions that affect them. Here are few ways you can glean just how supportive of youth your potential City Councillors are. One on One 1. What do your candidates plan to do about youth homelessness? Recent evidence suggests that more and more young people in Toronto are using the city’s homeless shelters. This trend, coupled with the increase in need for youth-oriented mental health services and more support for LGBTQ youth in shelters in Toronto, presents a problem on which City Council can no longer remain inactive. Ask your candidates what they plan to do increase affordable housing and transition support for youth in Toronto, especially those with mental health concerns and those who are members of the LGBTQ community.

2. What are your candidates’ strategies for supporting youth who are immigrants or who belong to racialized groups? Data from the Ontario Trillium Foundation suggests that more than one-third of youth in Toronto are immigrants and more than half of youth are members of a racialized group. These young people are often underserved by the current settlement supports for newcomers, which are themselves underfunded and difficult to navigate. While we regularly see media coverage about youth violence (sometimes with racist undertones), we hear less about the degree of support City Council offers for youth activities and programs in racialized communities. Do your candidates have any specific ideas for supporting newcomer and/or racialized youth in your Ward? If so, how do they plan to fund and implement them?

3. What are your candidates’ views of lowering transit fares? Many young people travel on public transit to school and work. The young people we spoke to clearly emphasized the need for Council to work to keep fares low so that youth, many of whom are only able to find precarious or part-time employment, can afford to travel in Toronto. What do you the potential candidates in your ward think about the idea of low transit fares? Are they interested in lowering fares, keeping the status quo, or raising them to pay for improvements? If they propose to keep fares as they are or lower them, how do they intend to pay for services in the future?

4. What are your candidates’ views on the Youth Equity Strategy? Earlier this year, as a result of a motion from Councillor Josh Matlow, Council received the Youth Equity Strategy, which included 28 concrete suggestions to improve life for youth and to reduce violence amongst young people in Toronto. Among the suggestions are the creation of a “youth equity champion” position, to be appointed from within Council, and the creation of a city-wide committee to combat the problem, which would include members from all the other committees of council. The initiatives proposed by the Youth Equity Strategy do amount to additional budget expenditures, but they’re ones that youth in Toronto are clamouring for. Do your council candidates support the Youth Equity Strategy? Are the dedicated to working at Council to advocate on behalf of youth to see it through?

Council candidates should be voices for all Toronto’s marginalized citizens, but arguably no one needs to have Council on their side more than our youth. Ask the right questions to find out if your prospective Councillors are indeed onside.

WiTOpoli to produce a new event series with Why Should I Care?

Why Should I Care? logo WSIC, with the letters w, s and c in grey, and the i in red with a megaphone coming out of the right sideWhy Should I Care? (WSIC) is a volunteer-run, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to providing a grassroots forum for discussing difficult political issues in a safe and non-partisan environment. Women in Toronto Politics and WSIC are collaborating to produce a series of free discussion-driven events focusing on issues affecting women in Toronto.

The series will take place across Toronto (Scarborough, Downtown/East York, Etobicoke and North York) and will invite speakers to give a brief talk on timely and important issues relevant to women of Toronto. Speakers will support open dialogue with the audience and engage with their questions and comments on the subject matter.

This series is an opportunity for women and allies across the city to explore the issues unfolding in their communities through a gender lens. The WSIC and WiTOpoli teams are committed to fostering non-partisan discussion, and we hope you’ll join us to share your thoughts and engage with your community.

On July 21st from 7:00-9:00pm, the joint WiTOpoli/WSIC series launches with a discussion about the new sex work laws proposed by the Canadian government, how these laws might impact Canadian sex workers and communities, and what alternatives we can explore. RSVP for the discussion on Eventbrite.

For more information on Why Should I Care?, check out their website. And don’t forget to visit the WiTOpoli Events page to stay tuned for more details about future events in the series!

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, July 4th

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • At City Hall this week, the Executive Committee reviewed a report on Fare Equity for low-income TTC riders. The issue will receive further attention at next week’s council meeting.
  • Torontoist‘s Desmond Cole urges us to reflect on how Rob Ford’s bigotry impacts the targets of his slurs.
  • Status of Women Minister Kellie Leitch wants corporations to voluntary set targets to increase female representation on boards. The suggestion prompted criticism from the the Liberals and NDP who claim the Conservatives have fallen behind in terms of gender parity at Crown corporations and other federal agencies.
  • Toronto has become the first and only municipality to join WBE Canada which connects women-owned businesses with potential corporate partners.
  • Toronto woman Mary Millard donated her $6 million fortune to the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, The Toronto Zoo and the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario. Other important notes: she loved Jane Austen and would “have been proud to call herself a feminist”.