WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, July 25

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Earlier this week, the City of Toronto called off plans to allow disabled citizens to vote online or by phone in the 2014 election, citing a lack of time to build and test the system. Council voted 29-1 to approve the cancellation, but did give preliminary authorization for online and phone voting by all voters, disabled and non-disabled, in future elections.
  • Bylaw enforcement officers will be at the controversial Ford Fest this Friday, ready to stop Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and Councillor Doug Ford from engaging in any politically motivated activities in the city-owned Thomson Memorial Park. More than 100 Torontonians have complained to city ombudsman Fiona Crean, and at least another 100 directly to city hall since the uproar over the Fords’ annual barbeque began.
  • The Toronto mayoral race continues to heat up, with a recent Forum Research survey indicating a statistical three-way tie between the top candidates. Olivia Chow had the support of 29 per cent of survey respondents, John Tory boasted 28 per cent, while Rob Ford’s approval held steady 27 per cent. Karen Stintz and David Soknacki lag behind with 6 and 5 per cent, respectively.
  • Vancouver Parks Board candidate Trish Kelly has been forced to abandon her campaign following the emergence of an online video she filmed about masturbation eight years ago, and in doing so has opened up a debate surrounding the significance of political candidates’ online activities. “There will always be some boundaries of what we’ll accept in terms of someone who wants to take a leadership role,” says Kelly. “But we need to have those conversations.” Had Kelly won, she would have been the first aboriginal member of Vancouver’s Park Board.
  • Research and policy institute Guttmacher has challenged the recent US Supreme Court decision surrounding birth control – which allows employers to opt-out of paying for health insurance for contraceptive coverage – by providing a comprehensive list of studies that  find that in addition to the health benefits for women and families, all contraceptive methods save insurers money.
  • Saudi women will be allowed to vote and stand as candidates in the upcoming municipal council elections expected to take place next year. Women were not allowed to participate in the 2011 elections. While female candidates will now have the rights to address their voters in a manner similar to their male competitors, gender segregation in the polling centers will still be enforced.
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