WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, June 12

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, June 5

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Concerned Citizens to End Carding, a group of prominent and influential voices, gathered together at City Hall Wednesday to call for an end to the practice
  • Bill 77 passed on Thursday making Ontario the first province to ban conversion therapy for LGBT youth
  • Next week, council will vote on the fate of the Gardiner expressway. Check out the Toronto Star’s latest update to see where they stand on the issue.
  • Ontario will allow ranked ballot systems to be used in the 2018 municipal elections, spurring media interest in who has the right to vote, including the 250,000 Torontonians who are not Canadian citizens. The CBC’s The 180 explores the merits of including these residents in the municipal voting process.
  • The Inside Agenda Blog explores policy options to address the lack of affordable housing in Ontario.
  • Ontario Legal Clinics are making services more accessible to precariously employed workers. Over the next 2 years legal clinics across Ontario will receive and additional $9.8 million to increase capacity and services.
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has concluded that the residential school program for aboriginal Canadians, that ran up until 1996, amounted to cultural genocide.
  • Ipolitics explores the impact of the “unofficial” Federal election campaign, suggesting it could be long, dirty and expensive.
  • Canadian banks and accounting firms are committing to the 30% Club to promote the inclusion of more women in senior corporate roles. The group aims to ensure women occupy 30% of their boards by 2020.
  • Patricia Lane shares her thoughts on how the First Past the Post system continues to leave women out of Federal Politics.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, May 29

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, May 22

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, May 15

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • #PoliceWeekONT was trending nationwide this week, as residents used the hashtag to ask key questions about Toronto’s carding policy. Though the hashtag was originally intended to highlight Ontario Police Week, Toronto police failed to engage with users criticizing carding.
  • Criticism of carding continued to mount as the case of Mutaz Elmardy highlighted the need for reform. Elmardy was awarded damages this week after suing a Toronto police offer who beat him. The incident occurred after the office stopped Elmardy on his way home even though he was not suspected of any crime. The Anti-Black Racism Network also held a press conference this week calling for an end to carding, outlining clear demands for the city and province to follow and highlighting their lack of accountability on the issue.
  • At a Ryerson event on Wednesday, Tory expressed concern over the lack of visible minorities on council but said he would not support extending the vote to permanent residents and others without citizenship
  • The Public Works committee left the fate of the Gardiner unresolved this week and it will continue to be debated at council. Here’s a handy FAQ to help navigate the issue.
  • CityNews reporter Shauna Hunt confronted soccer fans who shouted sexists remarks at her on-air, drawing attention to the daily harassment female reporters face. One of the men has since been fired and both have been banned from MLSE games for the next year.
  • After being punished for disobeying her school’s dress code, Moncton High School student Lauren Wiggins wrote a powerful letter to her Vice-Principal which she later published on social media, expressing her disdain for the unfair standards applied to female students.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, May 1

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, April 24

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, April 17

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Toronto Police Services (including Mayor Tory) has approved the heavily-criticized carding policy. The Ontario Human Rights Commissioner wrote an indignant letter to Chief Blair, noting “It is clear our recommendations have not been incorporated into the Procedure in any meaningful way and even the Board’s revised Policy indicates a retreat from earlier, more progressive positions.” In addition to the concern over human rights violations, the decision sets a dangerous precedent in terms of police accountability
  • An independent review released on Thursday details how CBC management failed to investigate Jian Ghomeshi and reports of workplace harassment. Media Critic Jesse Brown provides critical context to the CBC investigation
  • What will Toronto do about the Gardiner? Torontoist weighs the options and how this will reflect our city’s true priorities
  • The Canadian Labour Congress is recommending that minimum wage be raised to $15. As detailed by Press Progress, the amount of minimum wage jobs is increasing while it becomes more and difficult to live off those earnings for many Canadians. Protests were held across North America this week for the Fight for $15 campaign. 
  • Check out the full report from the Draw The Lines campaign which reviewing Toronto’s ward boundaries for municipal elections.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, April 3

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • At this week’s city council meeting, council accepted Rob Ford’s apology for his racist remarks but opted not to have the councillor attend anti-racist training. Council also rejected a motion to combine accountability offices, and will seek a third party assessment to review the four accountability offices.
  • The Toronto Police Services Board met yesterday to discuss the practice of “carding”, though the board ultimately voted to defer any decisions of the new rules until its next meeting on April 16th. For more background on the issue, check out these recent pieces from VICE and NOW.
  • Cheri Dinovo’s bill to ban conversion therapy for LGBTQ youth passed its second reading at Queen’s Park this Thursday, garnering support from all 3 provincial parties.
  • The Ontario minister of community safety and correctional services is urging the federal government to reject the recent amendments to Bill C-279, as “it’s essentially legalizing discrimination” for transgender Canadians
  • The Ontario Attorney General concluded its review of Canada’s new prostitution laws, declaring them to be constitutional. Premier Wynne had previously express “grave concerns” as to the laws constitutionality, and coalition of organizations are urging the province not to enforce the new law, for fear that it will continue to put sex workers in danger.
  • Toronto was among several Canadians cities which hosted protests this Thursday to urge a retrial in the Cindy Gladue case. Alberta prosecutors announced they will appeal the non-guilty verdict.
  • As of April 1st, approximately 70,000 temporary foreign workers lost their legal status in Canada, following the new “4 and 4” rule which forces labourers to leave the country after 4 years and wait another 4 years to re-apply for a work permit.
  • Although women are overrepresented in public service, they are noticeably underrepresented among the sector’s top earners.
  • Last weekend, the Broadbent Institute hosted the Progress Summit in Ottawa, including a keynote from feminist gaming critic Anita Sarkeesian. Toronto school trustee Ausma Malik also attended and discussed her views on being a millennial in politics with Maclean’s.

WiTOPoli Weekly: January 9, 2015

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.