WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, August 21

 A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

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WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, July 31st

 A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, June 19

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • At this week’s Toronto Police Service Board meeting, the board voted to adopt reforms on carding that were previously proposed in 2014 but rejected by Bill Blair. The decision to reform the practice instead of ending it contradicts Tory’s previous promise made last week. Under the new policy, officers should tell residents as much as possible that they have a right to refuse to provide their information to police, and they should only be stopping people when there is a genuine public safety concern.
  • There are still questions as to what will happen to information that has been collected thus far from carding, and how new provincial regulations may affect the practice once they’re implemented in the Fall. The TPSB meeting also brought news that chair Alok Mukherjee will resign, who has been vocal about carding reforms. His potential successor Andy Pringle has connections to both Tory and Bill Blair.
  • Stephen Harper announced federal funding for Tory’s SmartTrack on Thursday. The funds promised may cover up to a third of the proposed budget for SmartTrack. The feasibility of the the SmartTrack plan is currently being studied.
  • Women in Toronto’s food industry are taking up the hashtag #KitchenBitches and planning a September panel on harassment in the workplace. The campaign, largely spearheded by The Black Hoof’s Jen Agg, was inspired by the story of Kate Burnham who has taken her complaint to the Ontario Human Rights Commission.
  • Canada’s Chief of Defence Tom Lawson received major backlash for saying men are “biologically wired” to commit sexual assault.
  • In Ottawa, the OC Transpo service has developed a new tool to make it easier for bus riders to report incidents of sexual harassment.
  • As we all reflect on the Charleston shooting, learn more about the Emanuel AME’s tumultuous history and click here if you’d like to donate to the church itself.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, June 12

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, June 5

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Concerned Citizens to End Carding, a group of prominent and influential voices, gathered together at City Hall Wednesday to call for an end to the practice
  • Bill 77 passed on Thursday making Ontario the first province to ban conversion therapy for LGBT youth
  • Next week, council will vote on the fate of the Gardiner expressway. Check out the Toronto Star’s latest update to see where they stand on the issue.
  • Ontario will allow ranked ballot systems to be used in the 2018 municipal elections, spurring media interest in who has the right to vote, including the 250,000 Torontonians who are not Canadian citizens. The CBC’s The 180 explores the merits of including these residents in the municipal voting process.
  • The Inside Agenda Blog explores policy options to address the lack of affordable housing in Ontario.
  • Ontario Legal Clinics are making services more accessible to precariously employed workers. Over the next 2 years legal clinics across Ontario will receive and additional $9.8 million to increase capacity and services.
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has concluded that the residential school program for aboriginal Canadians, that ran up until 1996, amounted to cultural genocide.
  • Ipolitics explores the impact of the “unofficial” Federal election campaign, suggesting it could be long, dirty and expensive.
  • Canadian banks and accounting firms are committing to the 30% Club to promote the inclusion of more women in senior corporate roles. The group aims to ensure women occupy 30% of their boards by 2020.
  • Patricia Lane shares her thoughts on how the First Past the Post system continues to leave women out of Federal Politics.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, May 29

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, May 22

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.