WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, May 13

 

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Crown opted to accept a peace bond in the final sexual change against Ghomeshi instead of proceeding with the case in court. Complainant Kathryn Borel explained in her statement that the peace bond was “the clearest path to truth” as it required an admission of guilt on Ghomeshi’s part
  • At Queen’s Park, a debate on ranked ballots saw Toronto Councillor Justin Di Ciano advocating against the voting system, which has previously recived from John Tory and many other councillors
  • On Parliament Hill, MPs discussed a proposed gender equity bill which would encourage political parties to run more women candidates
  • The Liberals also made moves on electoral reform this week, though opposition parties criticized the party’s suggestion to create a committee with a majority of Liberal MPs
  • MPs Lisa Raitt and Ruth Ellen Brosseau discuss balancing child care with their House of Commons life

 

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WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, April 17

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Toronto Police Services (including Mayor Tory) has approved the heavily-criticized carding policy. The Ontario Human Rights Commissioner wrote an indignant letter to Chief Blair, noting “It is clear our recommendations have not been incorporated into the Procedure in any meaningful way and even the Board’s revised Policy indicates a retreat from earlier, more progressive positions.” In addition to the concern over human rights violations, the decision sets a dangerous precedent in terms of police accountability
  • An independent review released on Thursday details how CBC management failed to investigate Jian Ghomeshi and reports of workplace harassment. Media Critic Jesse Brown provides critical context to the CBC investigation
  • What will Toronto do about the Gardiner? Torontoist weighs the options and how this will reflect our city’s true priorities
  • The Canadian Labour Congress is recommending that minimum wage be raised to $15. As detailed by Press Progress, the amount of minimum wage jobs is increasing while it becomes more and difficult to live off those earnings for many Canadians. Protests were held across North America this week for the Fight for $15 campaign. 
  • Check out the full report from the Draw The Lines campaign which reviewing Toronto’s ward boundaries for municipal elections.

WiTOPoli Weekly: January 9, 2015

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

 

 

WiTOpoli Weekly: December 5, 2014

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Tomorrow is the National Day for Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. This year, December 6th marks the 25th anniversary of the Montreal Massacre. Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam hosts a commemoration today from 12:00-1:00 pm in the Member’s Lounge at City Hall. We’ve also compiled a list of other memorials being held around the city as well as information on a postcard campaign from the Coalition for Gun Control, which was founded in the wake of the Montreal Massacre.
  • Justice Minister Peter MacKay was criticized for remarks he made earlier this week, claiming that the motivation for the Montreal Massacre was unknown. Both Liberal leader Justin Trudeau and NDP leader Thomas Mulcair were swift to point out that the shooting was clearly an act of gendered violence and needs to be recognized as such.
  • Twenty-five city councillors signed a letter to Premier Kathleen Wynne, urging her to challenge the constitutionality of Canada’s newly drafted prostitution laws (Bill C-36) at the Ontario Court of Appeals. The signatories expressed concern over the bill’s “danger to some of the most vulnerable women we represent”. The letter will be presented in council today marking the National Day for Remembrance.
  • Mayor John Tory was sworn in this week, unveiling his new Executive Committee and appointing Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong as Deputy Mayor. At the top of Tory’s agenda is his plan to relieve traffic congestion. Be sure to check out Neville Park’s Cheat Sheet on how to keep up with council meetings and upcoming dates to follow.
  • Kathryn Borel came forward this week, identifying herself as one of the original sources in the Toronto Star’s Jian Ghomeshi investigation. Borel reveals how her workplace harassment was repeatedly mishandled by the CBC and how it affected her career.
  • A grand jury declined to indict an NYC police officer this week after the death of an unarmed black man named Eric Garner, despite having video evidence of the officer choking Garner to death. Protesters have been gathering across the U.S., echoing many of sentiments that continue to be expressed in Ferguson following last week’s failed indictment in the Michael Brown case.
  • As a part of the launch of Project 97 this week, Toronto MPP Cheri DiNovo shared her own experience with sexual assault. The Project 97 site was launched by Rogers media in order order to promote “a year-long conversation about sexual assault, abuse and harassment”.
  • The Canadian Labour Congress released a study this week documenting the impact of intimate partner violence in the workplace. The stats reveal how violence affects employees’ work performance and their ability to maintain their job. Ontario is the only province where intimate partner violence is recognized as a workplace safety issue.
  • Maclean’s columnist Scott Gilmore questioned why more women weren’t pursuing political office when their voices are so badly needed. We encourage you to peruse these A+ responses from #cdnpoli voices such as Equal Voice, Lauren Dobson-Hughes, Jordan Owens, Jenn Jeffreys and Vass Bednar.

 

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, November 28

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, November 7

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • As every media outlet shares their two cents on the Ghomeshi allegations, check out this media analysis on how publications are approaching these challenging topics.
  • Justin Trudeau dismissed two MPs from his caucus this week after complaints were brought forward by two other female MPs. Though details have been vague, sources have suggested the misconduct is connected to workplace sexual harassment on the Hill. In response to these revelations, at least one Parliament Hill staffer has come forward regarding his own experiences with sexual harassment. Premier Wynne has also noted that she herself has had to deal with sexual harassment complaints in her own provincial party.
  • The Alliance for Women’s Rights has launched their “Up for Debate”campaign, calling for a federal election specifically focused on women’s issues for the 2015 election.
  • A post-election post-mordem: consider this argument for ranked ballots or this piece on power of incumbency in municipal politics

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, October 31

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • This week, stories surfaced of 9 women who were assaulted by CBC Radio host Jian Ghomeshi. As the public continues to learn more about the situation, it’s important to consider how these stories relate to public discourse on sexual assault. and the circumstances that discourage women from speaking out on these issues.
  • Toronto’s newly elected council fails to represent the city’s diversity. On the bright side, shout out to Ausma Malik who won her spot as TDSB School Trustee in spite of the Islamophobic attacks launched against her.
  • Harper unveiled his income-splitting package this week, which has been criticized by his opponents for only benefitting “a small minority of people at a time when inequality in our society is increasing.” 
  • NDP Status of Women critic Niki Ashton hosted the Women’s Forum des Femmes in Ottawa on Thursday to “build a feminist agenda. You can follow along with the conversation here and at #WFDF14. 
  • And of course, a friendly reminder that Halloween is not for slut-shaming.