WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, December 12

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

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WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, September 5

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Polls are showing that Olivia Chow has fallen to third place in the Toronto mayoral race, behind John Tory and Rob Ford. The Toronto Star argues that this may be due to the falling popularity of the NDP and the rise in Liberal support in Toronto. Although Chow has tried to make her campaign “free of party politics,” she will be hoping for a large NDP turnout on election day.
  • Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says she has not heard from or spoken with PM Harper since March, even with her re-election more than two months ago. She admits that she has not “specifically asked for a conversation,” but that she hopes to create a good working relationship between the provincial and federal government. Premier Wynne also stated that she will be supporting Liberal leader, Justin Trudeau, during the upcoming federal election.
  • Olivia Chow has announced that, if elected as Toronto mayor, she would raise the land-transfer tax on high-end homes. Chow argues that raising the land-transfer fees by one per cent on homes worth more than $2-million would create an extra $20-million to fund school nutrition programs, as well as engineering studies to improve the TTC.
  • This week, Ontario students returned to school and full-day kindergarten programs are already facing difficulties. Educators and parents have already filed many complaints with the Ministry of Education about the large class sizes. While Ontario daycares must limit sizes to only eight children per one educator, and primary school classes can only have 23 students, there is currently no set limit for students in kindergarten classes.
  • After being treated for tongue and throat cancers which doctors say were caused by HPV, Conservative MP Peter Kent is now speaking out in favour of funding HPV vaccines for boys. Some provinces already vaccinate girls for free, but there is no funding at the moment to vaccinate boys. Kent says that he will speak to Health Minister Rona Ambrose about this idea, and will continued to do what he can to raise awareness of HPV and its links to cancer amongst men and women.
  • On Thursdaythe top four mayoral candidates met for a lunch debate organized by the Toronto Region Board of Trade and the Globe and Mail. Gathered in front of a sold-out crowd of business leaders, candidates used the opportunity to challenge each other on their respective funding proposals for transit, while also discussing youth unemployment and affordable housing.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, June 27

 

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • At City Hall this week, the Community Development and Recreation committee unanimously recommended that council implement mandatory anti-homophobia and anti-transphobia training in Toronto youth shelters. Council will vote on the issue July 8 or 9.
  • After a leading men’s rights group recently received charity status from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), NOW Magazine revealed that the group managed to name-drop a number women’s and queer rights organizations on their application to the CRA, without the knowledge of these organizations.
  • As pollsters continue to mull over the outcome of the provincial election, Global News provides statistical insight into the “Toronto-centric constituency that propelled Wynne to the majority”.
  • The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario is inviting input regarding its policy on “Physicians and the Ontario Human Rights Code”. The policy is currently being reviewed in light of reports made earlier this year that several Ottawa doctors refused to provide birth control prescriptions to patients because of the doctors’ moral and religious beliefs.

 

New Infographic from Elect Women Ontario and WiTOpoli

As Ontarians prepare to go to the polls in one week, Elect Women Ontario and Women in Toronto Politics have compiled data on the number of female candidates running for provincial office. The infographic below details the percentage of female candidates running for each of the four major parties, across 22 Toronto ridings. Click here for a list of these candidates and their contact information.

Of the declared candidates for the four major parties, 29.5% of candidates are women. 5 out of 26 women candidates in the Toronto region are incumbents: Laura Albanese, Mitzie Hunter, Soo Wong, Cheri DiNovo, and Kathleen Wynne. In comparison, there are 16 male incumbents in the Toronto region.

The numbers tell an interesting story: The Liberals run a lower percentage of women candidates in the Toronto region, where they dominate electorally, compared to in the rest of the province. In contrast, the PCs run a significantly higher percentage of women in the region of Toronto, where they have historically had limited electoral success, compared to in the rest of the province. Recent polling shows that the NDP is competitive in five central Toronto ridings; one of the NDP candidates in these ridings is a woman.

In addition to stats on Toronto ridings, Elect Women Ontario’s Tumblr contains information on the percentage of female candidates across the province, as well as data from past elections and other provinces. At dissolution, female MPPs made up 29% of the 40th Legislative Assembly of Ontario. Elect Women Ontario is committed to achieving gender parity at Queen’s Park, and we at WiTOpoli share in their passion to see more women engaged in all levels of politics.

Women Candidates in the GTA