WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, September 5

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Polls are showing that Olivia Chow has fallen to third place in the Toronto mayoral race, behind John Tory and Rob Ford. The Toronto Star argues that this may be due to the falling popularity of the NDP and the rise in Liberal support in Toronto. Although Chow has tried to make her campaign “free of party politics,” she will be hoping for a large NDP turnout on election day.
  • Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says she has not heard from or spoken with PM Harper since March, even with her re-election more than two months ago. She admits that she has not “specifically asked for a conversation,” but that she hopes to create a good working relationship between the provincial and federal government. Premier Wynne also stated that she will be supporting Liberal leader, Justin Trudeau, during the upcoming federal election.
  • Olivia Chow has announced that, if elected as Toronto mayor, she would raise the land-transfer tax on high-end homes. Chow argues that raising the land-transfer fees by one per cent on homes worth more than $2-million would create an extra $20-million to fund school nutrition programs, as well as engineering studies to improve the TTC.
  • This week, Ontario students returned to school and full-day kindergarten programs are already facing difficulties. Educators and parents have already filed many complaints with the Ministry of Education about the large class sizes. While Ontario daycares must limit sizes to only eight children per one educator, and primary school classes can only have 23 students, there is currently no set limit for students in kindergarten classes.
  • After being treated for tongue and throat cancers which doctors say were caused by HPV, Conservative MP Peter Kent is now speaking out in favour of funding HPV vaccines for boys. Some provinces already vaccinate girls for free, but there is no funding at the moment to vaccinate boys. Kent says that he will speak to Health Minister Rona Ambrose about this idea, and will continued to do what he can to raise awareness of HPV and its links to cancer amongst men and women.
  • On Thursdaythe top four mayoral candidates met for a lunch debate organized by the Toronto Region Board of Trade and the Globe and Mail. Gathered in front of a sold-out crowd of business leaders, candidates used the opportunity to challenge each other on their respective funding proposals for transit, while also discussing youth unemployment and affordable housing.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, August 22

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • City councillor Karen Stintz has dropped out of the Toronto mayoral race, citing low poll numbers and insufficient campaign funds. At a press conference at city hall on Thursday, Stintz admitted that she was “disappointed that my visions and ideas did not gain the traction I had hoped,” and indicated that she will be leaving politics permanently.
  •  Warren Kinsella, a senior advisor on Olivia Chow’s mayoral campaign, was in hot water this week over comments he madeabout candidate John Tory’s SmartTrack transit plan. Kinsella dubbed the plan as “Segregation Track” on Twitter Tuesday, pointing to the way it avoids two neighbourhoods with sizable black populations. “I unreservedly and genuinely express apologies for hurting your feelings,” wrote Kinsella in a blog post addressed to Tory.
  •  Stephen Harper has ruled out a national inquiry into missing and aboriginal women, despite persistent requests after the murder of 15 year-old Tina Fontaine. “We should not view this as sociological phenomenon,” the PM told a news conferenceThursday. “We should view it as crime.” Aboriginal women make up 4.3 per cent of the Canadian population, but account for 16 per cent of female homicides and 11.3 per cent of missing women.
  • A New Democrat MP has quit the caucus over what she felt was an excessively pro-Israel stance on the current conflict in Gaza. Sana Hassainia, who represents the Montreal-area riding of Vercheres-Les Patriotes, was specifically critical of NDP Leader Tom Mulcair in a blog post that appeared online Wednesday. Party members have responded by suggesting that Hassainia was simply looking for an excuse to cover up her poor attendance; so far this year, Hassainia has the worst voting record of all MPs, showing up for only 8.7 per cent of votes in the House of Commons.

 

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, July 25

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Earlier this week, the City of Toronto called off plans to allow disabled citizens to vote online or by phone in the 2014 election, citing a lack of time to build and test the system. Council voted 29-1 to approve the cancellation, but did give preliminary authorization for online and phone voting by all voters, disabled and non-disabled, in future elections.
  • Bylaw enforcement officers will be at the controversial Ford Fest this Friday, ready to stop Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and Councillor Doug Ford from engaging in any politically motivated activities in the city-owned Thomson Memorial Park. More than 100 Torontonians have complained to city ombudsman Fiona Crean, and at least another 100 directly to city hall since the uproar over the Fords’ annual barbeque began.
  • The Toronto mayoral race continues to heat up, with a recent Forum Research survey indicating a statistical three-way tie between the top candidates. Olivia Chow had the support of 29 per cent of survey respondents, John Tory boasted 28 per cent, while Rob Ford’s approval held steady 27 per cent. Karen Stintz and David Soknacki lag behind with 6 and 5 per cent, respectively.
  • Vancouver Parks Board candidate Trish Kelly has been forced to abandon her campaign following the emergence of an online video she filmed about masturbation eight years ago, and in doing so has opened up a debate surrounding the significance of political candidates’ online activities. “There will always be some boundaries of what we’ll accept in terms of someone who wants to take a leadership role,” says Kelly. “But we need to have those conversations.” Had Kelly won, she would have been the first aboriginal member of Vancouver’s Park Board.
  • Research and policy institute Guttmacher has challenged the recent US Supreme Court decision surrounding birth control – which allows employers to opt-out of paying for health insurance for contraceptive coverage – by providing a comprehensive list of studies that  find that in addition to the health benefits for women and families, all contraceptive methods save insurers money.
  • Saudi women will be allowed to vote and stand as candidates in the upcoming municipal council elections expected to take place next year. Women were not allowed to participate in the 2011 elections. While female candidates will now have the rights to address their voters in a manner similar to their male competitors, gender segregation in the polling centers will still be enforced.