WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, May 13

 

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Crown opted to accept a peace bond in the final sexual change against Ghomeshi instead of proceeding with the case in court. Complainant Kathryn Borel explained in her statement that the peace bond was “the clearest path to truth” as it required an admission of guilt on Ghomeshi’s part
  • At Queen’s Park, a debate on ranked ballots saw Toronto Councillor Justin Di Ciano advocating against the voting system, which has previously recived from John Tory and many other councillors
  • On Parliament Hill, MPs discussed a proposed gender equity bill which would encourage political parties to run more women candidates
  • The Liberals also made moves on electoral reform this week, though opposition parties criticized the party’s suggestion to create a committee with a majority of Liberal MPs
  • MPs Lisa Raitt and Ruth Ellen Brosseau discuss balancing child care with their House of Commons life

 

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WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, June 5

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • The Concerned Citizens to End Carding, a group of prominent and influential voices, gathered together at City Hall Wednesday to call for an end to the practice
  • Bill 77 passed on Thursday making Ontario the first province to ban conversion therapy for LGBT youth
  • Next week, council will vote on the fate of the Gardiner expressway. Check out the Toronto Star’s latest update to see where they stand on the issue.
  • Ontario will allow ranked ballot systems to be used in the 2018 municipal elections, spurring media interest in who has the right to vote, including the 250,000 Torontonians who are not Canadian citizens. The CBC’s The 180 explores the merits of including these residents in the municipal voting process.
  • The Inside Agenda Blog explores policy options to address the lack of affordable housing in Ontario.
  • Ontario Legal Clinics are making services more accessible to precariously employed workers. Over the next 2 years legal clinics across Ontario will receive and additional $9.8 million to increase capacity and services.
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has concluded that the residential school program for aboriginal Canadians, that ran up until 1996, amounted to cultural genocide.
  • Ipolitics explores the impact of the “unofficial” Federal election campaign, suggesting it could be long, dirty and expensive.
  • Canadian banks and accounting firms are committing to the 30% Club to promote the inclusion of more women in senior corporate roles. The group aims to ensure women occupy 30% of their boards by 2020.
  • Patricia Lane shares her thoughts on how the First Past the Post system continues to leave women out of Federal Politics.

WiTOpoli Weekly: Friday, May 29

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, November 7

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • As every media outlet shares their two cents on the Ghomeshi allegations, check out this media analysis on how publications are approaching these challenging topics.
  • Justin Trudeau dismissed two MPs from his caucus this week after complaints were brought forward by two other female MPs. Though details have been vague, sources have suggested the misconduct is connected to workplace sexual harassment on the Hill. In response to these revelations, at least one Parliament Hill staffer has come forward regarding his own experiences with sexual harassment. Premier Wynne has also noted that she herself has had to deal with sexual harassment complaints in her own provincial party.
  • The Alliance for Women’s Rights has launched their “Up for Debate”campaign, calling for a federal election specifically focused on women’s issues for the 2015 election.
  • A post-election post-mordem: consider this argument for ranked ballots or this piece on power of incumbency in municipal politics