WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, December 11

 

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

 

 

Advertisements

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, December 4

A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • Federal Transport Minister Marc Garneau nominally rejected the Toronto island airport expansion in November. The Liberal government, Minister Garneau included, remains firmly against the expansion of the Toronto island airport.
  • A Toronto doctor is making the financial case for opening five supervised injection sites in Ontario – two in Ottawa and three in Toronto. Dr. Ahmed Bayoumi claims that these sites will save money and decrease the number of cases of HIV and hepatitis C. Ontario’s Health Minister Eric Hoskins says that requests for such sites must come from municipalities.
  • Municipal Affairs Minister Ted McMeekin confirms that Toronto is the only city in Ontario that is allowed to charge a land transfer tax and there is no planned legislation that would allow other cities and towns to bring in their own tax.
  • Many Syrian refugees who have been offered the opportunity to come to Canada are not prepared to move by the end of the year, but the government is still committed to their goal to resettle a total 25,000 refugees. It has been confirmed that, of the 3318 privately-sponsored refugees to settle in Ontario, 80 percent of them will reside in Toronto.
  • According to a Toronto Star Investigation, drivers seeking their A licence, which is required to drive a truck, have a better chance of passing the road test at rural DriveTest Centres. Following the publication of this information, Transportation Minister Steven DelDuca expressed his commitment to ensuring that all DriveTest Centres are held to the same testing standards.
  • The 2015 Ontario Association of Food Banks Report found that nearly 360,000 adults and children are using food banks across Ontario monthly. Precarious employment, low wages and lack of affordable housing are some of the identified factors that contribute to food insecurity.
  • The Quebec government is proposing a legislation that would require that all firearms in Quebec be registered. Bill 64, the Firearms Registration Act, would impose a fine ranging from $500 to $5000 for failing to register a gun.
  • Three Toronto taxi drivers began a hunger strike at city hall in protest against Uber, which will be covered under city by-laws.
  • As the criminal trial against Constable James Forcillo continues, Desmond Cole argues we need to disarm the police.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, October 2

 A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • A Toronto police officer pleaded not guilty to the fatal shooting of 18-year old Sammy Yatim on a Dundas Streetcar in 2013. The trial is expected to last at least 8 weeks.
  • Tension rose during the Munk leaders’ debate on Canadian foreign policy when the three main party leaders debated over citizenship, refugees, security and the Keystone pipeline. Oxfam Canada’s Executive Director pointed out that women’s issues were excluded from the foreign policy discussion.
  • Excluded from another federal election debate, Green Party leader Elizabeth May uses Twitterto participate in the Munk foreign policy debate.
  • woman wearing a hijab was harassed in Montreal this week and reported in to police as a hate crime. In last week’s French language debate, Harper repeated his refrain that women should not be allowed to wear a niqab during citizenship ceremonies, even though the courts have already contested his stance.
  • The Ontario government is seeking to appeal property tax assessments. Mayor John Tory responds with the threat of increasing the rent on properties the city leases to the province.
  • City councillors voted on regulating Uber under city by-laws. Proposals include that the starting fare for taxis be reduced by $1 and that Uber refrain from operating until the regulations are amended. A report is expected this spring.

WiTOPoli Weekly: Friday, July 24th

 A roundup of some of the latest news in women, Toronto, and/or politics this week. What stories did you read this week? Tell us in the comments.

  • This week WiTPoli released a statement in solidarity with women who experience harassment online.
  •  Universal Child Care Benefits have been big news this week. Several policy options have been put forward in anticipation of the fall election, to address ever-increasing costs for child care in Canada. FYI: you have to register to qualify, you can do so here.
  •  Toronto’s debate on regulating popular ride-share company Uber continues. Fines have been instituted for drivers, which could reach up to $20 000. 72 charges were filed against Uberx drivers this week.
  • In response to the TCH report released early this week Toronto will be investing $300 million to begin addressing the massive backlog of repairs required in TCH buildings.
  • Deciding what to do about Toronto’s insufficient transit system has become a topic in the national ‘pre-election,” as hopeful Prime Ministers vie for urban attention. Meanwhile, the Mayor and Premier of Ontario are pushing the extended Scarborough subway despite concerns.
  • Oh yeah, did we mention Toronto is over budget for Pan-Am? But Canada is collecting some gold, in medallion form.
  •  If you are curious about how your city councillor voted on issues that are important to you, you can check out the Star’s policards.